Scale the human touch in advertising

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Omaisau Ha Noi

By Thu Ngo

A slight steering away from the Korean fatherhood for today.

On searching information for my part 2, Fatherhood in Vietnam and how it is represented in the reality show, I came across an article on the OPPO “Fatherhood” tied to the brand’s sponsorship for the Vietnamese ver of “Dad, Where Are We Going?”.

Created by BBDO Vietnam, the two TV commercial videos deliver a message that “Fatherhood takes two hands,” depicting moments a father and his kid share without any aid of technology. Or, a smartphone company makes an ad to discourage their customers to use their products.

The OPPO ads somehow resonates with emotional advertisements of Thailand which have become viral through YouTube these days. It seems that every other day there’s a new weepie that tugs at the heartstrings. The most recent: “The Power of Love,” a commercial from Y&R for DTAC portraying a new father being…

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Reality Shows – How TV industry negotiates with changes in contemporary masculinity [1]

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Omaisau Ha Noi

By Thu Ngo

On 30 January 2013, in an interview with Korean Newsen, Im Hyung-taek, Director of Running Man confirmed the show’s filming schedule in early February in Vietnam. This news when coming out actually made headlines of many Vietnamese online newspapers after shaking the local fan-sites of this show.

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What interested the Vietnamese in 2015?

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Omaisau Ha Noi

The last days of 2015 are filled with local online articles on the Google list on what has been searched the most in 2015 by the Vietnamese people. Interestingly, 10 out of 10 names of the list belong to the Entertainment category. Son Tung-MTP has become the phenomenon of the year when three of his love songs were pinned up to the top of the list.

My feeling when first seeing the list posted on BBC page one week earlier than the local news was just slightly amused because a) I had no idea about most of the names in the list, except for No. 5 (Furious 7 for Paul Walker and his tragic death), No. 9 (the Indian drama series about child marriage practice as my mom and dad are regular watchers at home), and No. 10 (for the singer, main source of inspiration for the movie, was just around my…

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Reality Shows – How TV industry negotiates with changes in contemporary masculinity [2]

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Omaisau Ha Noi

A Dream of An Ideal Fatherhood

By Thu Ngo

4RYHqjA Poster of Chinese adaptation “Dad, Where Are We Going?” (Photo courtesy: Soompi.com)

The success of ‘Dad, Where are We Going?’ (WWG) in my opinion is attributed to the construction, or to be more exact, the reconstruction of fatherhood among the audience not only South Korean ones but also those in other Asian countries.

Regarding the definition and symbolisation of fatherhood in pre-modern East Asia, Confucianism has been the most influential. The system was in fact spread to other East Asian countries including South Korea thanks to China’s invasion throughout the region in the pre-modern era. Joseon Dynasty of Korea (1392-1910) was the most heavily influenced by Confucianism of all dynasties in East-Asia (Taga 2005:130). One of the most influential concepts constructing East Asian masculinities including the image of a father in the family that Confucianism presents include patriarchal authoritarianism…

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‘Descendants of the Sun’ and Vietnam War – an Unexpected Relation

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Omaisau Ha Noi

By Thu Ngo

The South Korean troops executed civilian massacres [in the South Vietnam] but no apologies have been heard. And today, we are enjoying such a series as ‘Descendants of the Sun’?

What are we then? Have we lost our mind?

[…]

Please think of our innocent people whose death has not been properly acknowledged …

That is my translation of a long message entitled “Please…” which has been rampantly shared among Vietnamese facebook users since yesterday. Written by a local reporter who used to write about the Hallyu as well as he self-claimed, the status received more than 70,000 likes shortly after being posted [1].

Perhaps when starting the filming, the staff of ‘Descendants of the Sun’ (DOTS), the series mentioned directly in the post, did not expect the drama would stir up the public opinions in this way: bringing up to the public a war…

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Hanoi Today, Anything to Miss?

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Omaisau Ha Noi

Words by Lan Huong

(The original version in Vietnamese can be found here)

Whenever talking about a beautiful Hanoi, I wonder why it is always a uniform image for almost everyone: some tiny street corner which must be in the Old Quarter. Once a holiday comes, there also comes a bundle of photos sharing one theme implying “Hanoi – the more deserted, the more beautiful”; and the caption runs “just like old days”. Publishing houses are busy digging up books on Hanoi in early years of the last century. One of them is “Old Hanoi” by Doan Ke Thien. So how about Hanoi of today? Is there anything to miss?

Never before has nostalgia been such profitable. A series of coffee shops whose decoration reminds of the subsidy era have been opened and enjoyed a boom. Modern restaurants imitating the 80s’ trading food stalls selling dishes of poor and…

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Vietnam as a Japanophile

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Omaisau Ha Noi

Just another rambling thought on a not-so-new topic: Vietnam’s fandom for Japan. My friend today asked me about some trends in shopping behaviour of Vietnam and when discussing, I just (re)realised how much “Made-In-Japan” things are favoured by most of my acquaintances.

According to the 2015 survey by Pew, 82% of the Vietnamese population answered to be “fan” of Japan while only 19% claimed to be pro-China. This survey was conducted among 15,310 people from 10 Asia-Pacific countries and the US from 6 April to 25 July, 2015. Excluding in the PRC and ROK, Japan is the most favourite country in most of the surveyed nations. Vietnam ranked second in the list, only behind Malaysia whose population interestingly love both Japan (84%) and China (78%). The generation gap was also reflected in the survey when young Vietnamese accounted for 59% of the population saying “like Japan very much”. Meanwhile…

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